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Message in a Bottle

Last week I returned from 8 days in Las Vegas. I was there to attend HRevolution, and a friend’s wedding. If some know-it-all ever tells you that 8 days is a long time to spend in Vegas…well, they’re a wise and knowledgeable individual, so ask them for investment advice.

Although it was long, my trip was a tremendous time during which I met brilliant and funny HR folks from all over the world, consumed (too much) excellent food and drink, and celebrated with dear friends. It was great, and I learned a lot, much of which is applicable to HR. Read more

The Robot Economy’s Less Obvious Dangers

We live in an age of job insecurity. If it wasn’t enough to be worried about being ‘restructured’ or outsourced, the recent surge in press about the robot workforce of the future gives us another reason to toss and turn at night.

“You’d better be nice to the robots”

The chatter about how many of us will be replaced by robots in the coming years has reached fever pitch of late. Some of it is rehashed fear-mongering (“Just look at what happened to the travel agents!”), but others raise provocative points about what the future of work will look like. Recent studies and analyses indicate that automation has the potential to make 45%70% of today’s jobs obsolete in the coming decades, and that a key competency for the employee of the future may be the ability to work alongside collaborative robots. Read more

What Marissa Mayer Wears in Vogue Doesn’t Matter

Oh, I hate to be so predictable as to write anything about Marissa Mayer, but I simply can’t stop myself this time.

So, Mayer was featured in Vogue, and a particular photo of her laid out on a chaise lounge in a form-fitting dress and stilettos has provoked the angry people that care about such things. Apparently none more so than some guy named Steve Cody who writes for Inc.

Cody’s Inc article starts by comparing Mayer to Martha Stewart (convicted criminal) and Paula Deen (now largely assumed to be a racist) and just goes downhill from there. In rapid succession he mocks her choice to wear expensive clothes, her ‘faux geekiness’ (but also her valley girl speak), calls her a micromanager, and overall is so unconsciously chauvinistic that I want to start a fund to send him to therapy to address whatever underlying issues he’s clearly suffering from. Read more

How We Fool Ourselves Into Bad Hiring

“You must have chaos within you to give birth to a dancing star.”  ― Friedrich Nietzsche

Hiring the right person is not easy. No matter how much we’d like to think otherwise, good hiring is more art than science; and like many art forms, creative approaches abound.

A few weeks ago I happened to come across a Glassdoor tweet, linking to an article about the ‘hardest’ interview questions out there. Curious, I clicked through, and was involuntarily overcome with an acute episode of eye-rolling, due to the fact that by ‘hardest’, the writer actually meant ‘senseless’. I was further irritated to note that a former employer of mine was represented on this list, dutifully reported by the poor, unfortunate souls who had been subjected to this nonsense and lived to tell the tale. Read more

Are We Worrying About the Wrong ‘Skills Gap’?

There’s been quite a lot of dialogue in recent years about the ‘Skills Gap’, and the ‘War for Talent’, most of which is a lamentation about the finite proportion of in-demand, skilled workers that our organizations are playing tug-of-war over. If and why this gap persists is a subject of some controversy, but that’s not what this post is about. It’s about a different, and undoubtedly real skills gap, one that HR and business leaders should be truly worried about. Rather than existing at the narrow pinnacle of the workforce ‘pyramid’, it’s found below, eroding its crumbling base. Read more

Organizational Immigration

There are few experiences as humbling as starting a new job. Overnight, you are transformed from a fully competent contributor to an unproven rookie. You enter a new world, where the language, customs and culture are unfamiliar. The mental ‘maps’ you’ve used to navigate your past environment are of limited help; in fact, they may lead you astray. Though certain practices, interactions or cues you encounter might look like ones you’ve experienced before, in this new landscape they may carry a very different meaning than what you assume.

In this respect, entering a new organization is profoundly similar to moving to a foreign country. I should know. When I was 13 years old, one of many moves with my family led us to Saudi Arabia, where we lived for 5 years. Even now, I can play the scenes of our arrival and first days in my head like a video recording. The chaotic airport, the oppressively hot night air, the strange smells and staccato Arabic enveloping us, the desolate nothingness of the desert highway at night, and the gecko perched near our new front door as if to welcome us. Whether a new organization, or a new country, the complete immersion into a different culture feels a lot like waking up in a Picasso painting. Read more

Impact99 2013 – My Profile

Hello everyone, I hope your weeks are going well! This week I am being profiled by Pam Ross over at Impact99. If you’re not familiar with this unique HR summit, taking place in Vancouver and Toronto, I encourage you to check it out and consider attending. It’s all about an authentic, underlying desire to question the status quo and explore alternate approaches to HR and the workplace, and the potential that social and digital technologies have to impact our organizations. The relatively small group of participants, the interactive format, and Pam and Christine’s whole approach and presence really contribute to an exciting, organic experience.

You can check out my post related to last year’s summit here. Plus, I personally promise that anyone who decides to attend the Toronto summit based on my recommendation will be owed several pints on my tab ;) Cheers folks!

Jane

Evidence-Based HR: Are We Kidding Ourselves?

Metrics. Big data. Analytics. If you work in HR and haven’t heard these words over and over again in the last few years then you probably work for ‘Underground Bunkers R Us’. The rest of us have heard again and again that the next big thing in HR is learning how to better capture and use the information we are all awash in to make our work more evidence-based, measurable and targeted.

In a recent article series for Personnel Today, Paul Kearns sets the bar even higher, making the case for putting HR on the same professional footing as medicine in Part 1 ‘It is Time to Build HR into a True Profession’:

“It [HR] is a highly skilled job that requires the same level of training and dedication as the most qualified and experienced brain surgeons.”

“If HR is to achieve the requisite level of professionalism, it has to become as scientific as it can be, and that requires methods based on the best evidence available.” Read more

HR, The Hulk & Sandwiches

Happy Saturday everyone! It’s a little extra happy if you’re in Canada, as it is the Victoria Day long weekend and the sun is shining. Hope you’re all enjoying it as much as I am. Things have been a bit quiet on the blog in recent weeks, but I assure you that I have several posts on the way. This week I was honoured to write a guest post over at The Buzz on HR, celebrating the anniversary of Sarah Williams’ fantastic blog by writing about What HR Means to Me. As it turns out, that has something to do with The Hulk (Incredible, not Hogan), sandwiches, and the lack of sorcery involved in HR. Sometimes I am as surprised as anyone about how these things turn out…

Anyway,  please take a minute to check it out, and stay tuned for new Talent Vanguard content soon!

Jane

HR’s Future: ‘People Persons’ Need Not Apply

I strongly dislike the phrase “put the human back in human resources”. In part because it has become an unimaginative cliché and also because it usually sits atop a passive-aggressive treatise pleading with HR people to stop being such heartless, paper-loving bureaucrats and realize that employees are people too.

The premise underlying these arguments is usually that doing HR well is really just a matter of caring about people. This is nonsense, and does our profession a significant disservice. To see what this belief has wrought, ask 10 HR students why they want to work in HR, and I will wager money that at least 7 of them will say “ Because I’m a real ‘people person’”. Sigh….. Read more

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